In ethics lecture, Linda Greenhouse discusses the Supreme Court’s role in threatening civil society

Linda Greenhouse

Credit: Martha Stewart

Linda Greenhouse, the Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law and Knight Distinguished Journalist-in-Residence at Yale Law School, delivered the Kissel Lecture in Ethics at Harvard Law School on Feb. 7.

In her lecture, Greenhouse discussed the role of the Supreme Court in threatening civil society and looked critically at recent Supreme Court decisions, including Janus v. AFSCME; Masterpiece Cakeshop  v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission; Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores; and the Little Sisters of the Poor litigation. She argued the Court should consider a moral framework in addition to case law and precedent when deciding cases.

Read full coverage in the Harvard Crimson.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who covered the United States Supreme Court for 30 years for the New York Times,  Greenhouse was named the Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law and Knight Distinguished Journalist-in-Residence at Yale Law School in 2009 after a 40-year career at the New York Times. At Yale, she is a member of the faculty of the Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic and teaches other Supreme Court-related courses. Greenhouse currently writes a bi-weekly op-ed column on the Supreme Court and law for the New York Times as a contributing columnist.

Sponsored by Harvard University’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, the annual lecture is named for the late Lester Kissel ’31, an attorney in the New York firm of Seward & Kissel and longtime benefactor of Harvard University’s ethical programs and activities.