Trading liberty for security

By Adrian Vermeule ’93

Thanks largely to initiatives by Presidents of both parties, American law and policy has adapted flexibly to the new environment, trading off some liberty for greater gains in security. Continue Reading »

HLS Reflects on the Legacy of Justice Scalia

With the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia ’60 of the U.S. Supreme Court on February 13 has come an outpouring of remembrances and testaments to his transformative presence during his 30 years on the Court. On February 24, Dean Martha Minow and a panel of seven Harvard Law School professors, each of whom had a personal or professional connection to the justice, gathered to remember his life and work.

Faculty Sampler: From medical tourism to the system of the Constitution

“Medical tourism—the travel of patients who are residents of one country (the ‘home country’) to another country for medical treatment (the ‘destination country’)—represents a growing and important business,” writes Assistant Professor I. Glenn Cohen ’03 in a recent article.

Vermeule in TNR: Constitutional conventions

In light of the late-June Supreme Court decision on the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Harvard Law School Professor Adrian Vermeule ’93 recently reviewed Michael J. Gerhardt’s “The Power of Precedent” (Oxford University Press) for The New Republic’s online review ‘The Book.’  According to Vermeule, Gerhardt’s book is a “learned overview” of the role of past decisions in today’s legal system.