To Tell the Truth: Alumna’s new film about family secrets to show at Boston film festival (video)

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Lacey Schwartz ’03 will return to Cambridge this weekend to speak about her new documentary “Little White Lie,” showing Saturday Nov. 15 and 17 as part of the Boston Jewish Film Festival. The film traces her personal story of being raised as a white Jewish girl in Woodstock, N.Y., only to find out as a young adult that her biological father was an African-American man with whom her mother had an affair.

Alumni fare well in midterm elections

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Harvard Law School graduates across the country won political victories as part of the nation’s midterm elections. Rep. Tom Cotton ’02 (R-Ark.) successfully challenged two-term Democratic Senator Mark Pryor in a contentious Senate race, helping the GOP win control of the Senate. A number of HLS alumni currently serve in the Senate. In this year’s […]

Ninth Circuit judge recounts landmark case at HIRC 30th anniversary

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On June 17, about 200 Harvard Law School alumni and students gathered to mark the 30th anniversary of the Harvard Immigration & Refugee Clinical Program (HIRC). It was a celebration of “30 Years of Social Change Lawyering,” and it brought together advocates from around the country and the world.

Running a Federal Agency: A Conversation with Julius Genachowski and Jonathan Zittrain

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Harvard Law School Professor Jonathan Zittrain ’95 sat down for a conversation with Julius Genachowski ’91, former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and partner and managing director of The Carlyle Group, in April. In a wide-ranging discussion, Genachowski, who recently served as inaugural holder of the Steven and Maureen Klinsky Professorship of Practice for Leadership […]

First Public Service Venture Fund ‘Seed Grant’ recipients challenge debtors’ prison in Alabama

Supreme Court To Rule On California’s Overcrowded Prisons

  Until last month, scores of destitute people—virtually all of them African Americans— languished in the city jail of Montgomery, Ala., for unpaid traffic tickets they couldn’t pay off, sentenced to one day in jail for every $50 they owed. They could earn another $25 credit daily by providing free labor, scrubbing blood and feces […]