Reforming criminal justice: New HLS program aims to influence national policies


Larry Schwartztol, executive director of Harvard Law School’s Criminal Justice Program of Study, Research and Advocacy, recently spoke with the Harvard Gazette about the HLS program, his role in it, and a conference sponsored by the new initiative on how the media helps shape the criminal justice narrative.

Yochai Benkler on whistleblowers, the news ecosystem and self-organizing in the commons

Yochai Benkler

Yochai Benkler, who has written extensively on the “networked public sphere,” including his influential book “The Wealth of Networks,” recently spoke about his proposal for a defense of whistleblowers, his testimony in a trial of a well-known leaker of military documents, and a problem he calls a growing crisis in the country.

Freedom Is Just Another Word for … Regulation

Joseph Singer book illustration HLB Fall 2015

Property law expert Joseph Singer argues that regulations make markets and property possible and promotes conservatives values. Regulations are needed to protect us from harm and fraudulent actions by others, to ensure that people can acquire property, and to allow all of us to exercise equal freedoms, he writes

Harvard Law’s First Century


For a deep, detailed, compellingly written, unstintingly transparent view of Harvard Law School as it was from the fall of 1817 (six students) to the spring of 1910 (765 students), look to “On the Battlefield of Merit”—the first of two volumes intended to mark the school’s bicentennial in 2017.

Faculty Books In Brief—Fall 2015

“Choosing Not to Choose: Understanding the Value of Choice,” by Professor Cass R. Sunstein ’78 (Oxford). Choice, while a symbol of freedom, can also be a burden: If we had to choose all the time, asserts the author, we’d be overwhelmed. Indeed, Sunstein argues that in many instances, not choosing could benefit us—for example, if mortgages could be automatically refinanced when interest rates drop significantly.