An opening for measles: anti-vaccination trend a growing concern

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The numbers paint a telling picture. In the United States of the 1950s there were between 3 million and 4 million annual cases of measles, a highly infectious virus that causes severe flu-like symptoms and a spreading red rash. Roughly 48,000 of those infected each year were hospitalized, and 400 to 500 died. By 2000, […]

NY Times: Lani Guinier redefines diversity, re-evaluates merit

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In a recent Q&A in the New York Times, Harvard Law School Professor Lani Guinier discusses her new book, “The Tyranny of the Majority: Fundamental Fairness in Representative Democracy” in which she argues for a rethinking of merit, typically measured by standardized test scores, that would better reflect the values of a democratic society.

Lecturer Emily Broad Leib awarded Climate Change Solutions Fund grant

Emily Broad Lieb

Lecturer on Law Emily Broad Leib, the director of Harvard Law School’s Food Law and Policy Clinic, was awarded a research grant in the inaugural year of Harvard President Drew Faust’s Climate Change Solutions Fund. Broad Leib’s project, “Reducing Food Waste as a Key to Addressing Climate Change,” was one of seven chosen to confront the challenge of climate change using the levers of law, policy, and economics, as well as public health and science.

Death penalty, in retreat: Interview with Professor Carol Steiker

Carol Steiker Preferred Faculty Photo, as of 3/3/14

HLS Professor Carol Steiker is using her year as the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study’s Rita E. Hauser Fellow to work with her brother and frequent collaborator, Jordan M. Steiker, on a book about the past half-century’s experiment with the constitutional regulation of capital punishment in America. She recently spoke with the Harvard Gazette about the history and future of the death penalty in the United States.