Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program attains major First Circuit victory involving persecution in Guatemala

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In a landmark immigration decision involving a claim of eligibility for asylum, the First Circuit Court of Appeals has issued an opinion finding past persecution in the case of a Mayan man, based on the long history of genocide in Guatemala and related racist mistreatment. The client in the case, Manuel Ordonez-Quino, was represented by Harvard Law School Senior Clinical Instructors John Willshire Carrera and Nancy Kelly, co-managing directors of the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic at Greater Boston Legal Services.

Ninth Circuit judge recounts landmark case at HIRC 30th anniversary

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On June 17, about 200 Harvard Law School alumni and students gathered to mark the 30th anniversary of the Harvard Immigration & Refugee Clinical Program (HIRC). It was a celebration of “30 Years of Social Change Lawyering,” and it brought together advocates from around the country and the world.

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau students take Hague Convention case to Trial

Harvard Legal Aid Bureau – Breana Ware ’14, Clinical Instructor Verner Moore, Nick Pastan ’15

On January 28, 2014, Harvard Legal Aid Bureau (HLAB) student attorneys Nicholas Pastan ’15 and Breana Ware ’14 found themselves conducting a trial in federal court and asking a Judge to decline to enforce a Petition brought against their client pursuant to the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction.

HLS students draft memorandum accompanying bill to restore immigrant trust in local law enforcement

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Thirty-three professors from Massachusetts law schools have signed on to an important legal opinion drafted by Harvard Law students in support of the Massachusetts Trust Act. The bill seeks to restore the immigrant community’s trust in local law enforcement by limiting the role of local police authorities in the deportation process.

Court decision in appeal argued by HLS clinical students will benefit thousands of disabled vets

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The U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims has ruled that Lieutenant Colonel Wilson J. Ausmer, Jr., a highly decorated veteran, should be able to file an appeal of his disability claim even though he had missed the 120-day deadline to do so. The case was argued before the Court in October 2013 at Harvard Law School as part of the Veterans Clinic of the WilmerHale Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School.