Congressman Sarbanes proposes Government By the People Act as way to limit influence of money in politics

John Sarbanes

Just days after the Supreme Court decided McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, which struck down aggregate limits on individual campaign contributions, U.S. Rep. John Sarbanes ’88 (D-Md.) delivered a keynote address at a Harvard Law School symposium on proposed legislation to reform campaign finance and dilute the influence of major donors.

The politics of money: Feldman on the Court and campaign finance

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The U.S. Supreme Court has struck down aggregate campaign contribution limits, in a ruling that frees individuals to donate to as many candidates as they wish. Harvard Law School’s Noah Feldman, Bemis Professor of International Law, spoke with the Harvard Gazette about the ruling, and what it means for elections and for the future of campaign-finance reform.

The Insular Cases: Constitutional experts assess the status of territories acquired in the Spanish–American War (video)

Reconsidering Insular Cases

More than 100 years after the U.S. Supreme Court decided a series of cases that left citizens of territories including Puerto Rico, Guam and the American Samoa with only limited Constitutional rights, Harvard Law School hosted a conference to reconsider the so-called Insular Cases and the resonance they continue to hold today.

Massachusetts High Court rules warrants needed for cellphone tracking; Cyberlaw Clinic submits supporting brief

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On Tuesday, the Supreme Judicial Court ruled in Commonwealth v. Augustine that the Massachusetts constitution prohibits law enforcement officials from gathering cellphone records that track individuals’ locations without first obtaining a search warrant from a state judge. Harvard Law School’s Cyberlaw Clinic, which provides pro-bono legal services to clients in matters involving the Internet, technology […]

Will the Supreme Court fundamentally alter the laws governing labor unions and collective bargaining? A Q&A with Benjamin Sachs

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Harvard Law School Professor Benjamin Sachs, a labor law specialist who focuses on unions in politics, sat down with a reporter for the HLS News office to reflect on the Supreme Court’s increased involvement in labor cases and the state of labor law today.

The Long Game

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However much presidents want to influence the future through their judicial appointments, the problem, Professor Mark Tushnet writes in his new book, “In the Balance: Law and Politics on the Roberts Court” (Norton, 2013), “is that things change.”