Death penalty, in retreat: Interview with Professor Carol Steiker

Carol Steiker Preferred Faculty Photo, as of 3/3/14

HLS Professor Carol Steiker is using her year as the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study’s Rita E. Hauser Fellow to work with her brother and frequent collaborator, Jordan M. Steiker, on a book about the past half-century’s experiment with the constitutional regulation of capital punishment in America. She recently spoke with the Harvard Gazette about the history and future of the death penalty in the United States.

Harvard Magazine: The Legal Olympian

sunstein-main-2

Cass Sunstein ’78, has been regarded as one of the country’s most influential and adventurous legal scholars for a generation. At 60, now Walmsley University Professor at Harvard, he publishes significant books as often as many productive academics publish scholarly articles—three of them last year.

Fighting Unequal Justice

Alec Karakatsanis ’08 (left) and Phil Telfeyan ’08 (HLB Fall 2014)

Until last spring, scores of destitute people—virtually all of them African-Americans—were locked up in the city jail of Montgomery, Alabama, for traffic tickets they couldn’t pay, sentenced to a day in jail for every $50 they owed. They could earn a $25 credit daily by providing free labor, scrubbing blood and feces off jail floors and cleaning buildings.