Juvenile in Justice: HLS hosts photo exhibit by Richard Ross (video)

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Nearly 70,000 young people in the United States are held by law in detention or correctional facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them. Over the past eight years, Photographer Richard Ross has visited more than 200 juvenile detention centers in 31 states to shed light on the stark conditions faced by these […]

Retiring but Not Shy

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For decades, Alan M. Dershowitz has led a frenetic life as author of dozens of books, legal counsel to a multitude of celebrities and ubiquitous TV commentator on myriad issues of the day. Known to many around the world for his brash style and high-profile cases, after 50 years, Dershowitz is now leaving the role he loves best: Harvard Law School teacher.

Four HLS professors ‘think big’ at annual event

Professors at “HLS Thinks Big”

“HLS Thinks Big,” an event inspired by the global TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) talks and modeled after the university’s “Harvard Thinks Big” event, was held at Harvard Law School on May 28. Four professors—Daniel Nagin, Glenn Cohen ’03, Jeannie Suk ’02, and James Greiner—presented on some of their recent work and research.

Access to Justice After ‘Gideon’ Videos

[L-R] Deborah Rhode, John Farmer Jr., and Jacqui Bowman

Fifty years after the Supreme Court determined in Gideon v. Wainwright that criminal defendants must be provided with counsel, scholars and practitioners from around the country grappled with continued limits on access to justice during an Harvard Law School conference in April titled “Toward a Civil Gideon: The Future of Legal Services.”

Ken Burns offers preview of ‘Central Park Five’ at HLS (video)

Ken Burns and HLS Professor Charles Ogletree

On March 12 at Harvard Law School, award-winning filmmaker Ken Burns joined Harvard Law School Professor Charles Ogletree and two Central Park Five members for a film screening and panel discussion of his new documentary “The Central Park Five,” which tells the story of five Black and Latino teenagers who were wrongly convicted of raping and beating a white woman in New York City’s Central Park in 1989. The event was co-sponsored by Harvard Law School’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race & Justice and the Prison Studies Project and the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research.