First Public Service Venture Fund ‘Seed Grant’ recipients challenge debtors’ prison in Alabama

Supreme Court To Rule On California’s Overcrowded Prisons

  Until last month, scores of destitute people—virtually all of them African Americans— languished in the city jail of Montgomery, Ala., for unpaid traffic tickets they couldn’t pay off, sentenced to one day in jail for every $50 they owed. They could earn another $25 credit daily by providing free labor, scrubbing blood and feces […]

Harvard Gazette: A Q&A with Ronald Sullivan on the economic and social costs of rising U.S. incarcerations

Ronald Sullivan Preferred Faculty Photo, as of 3/3/14

Ronald S. Sullivan Jr., clinical professor of law and director of the Criminal Justice Institute at Harvard Law School, recently spoke with the Harvard Gazette about racial and national sentencing disparities, the economic and social costs of mass incarceration, and the sentencing reforms now under consideration.

Juvenile in Justice: HLS hosts photo exhibit by Richard Ross (video)

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Nearly 70,000 young people in the United States are held by law in detention or correctional facilities that treat, confine, punish, assist and, occasionally, harm them. Over the past eight years, Photographer Richard Ross has visited more than 200 juvenile detention centers in 31 states to shed light on the stark conditions faced by these […]

Retiring but Not Shy

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For decades, Alan M. Dershowitz has led a frenetic life as author of dozens of books, legal counsel to a multitude of celebrities and ubiquitous TV commentator on myriad issues of the day. Known to many around the world for his brash style and high-profile cases, after 50 years, Dershowitz is now leaving the role he loves best: Harvard Law School teacher.