Reforming criminal justice: New HLS program aims to influence national policies


Larry Schwartztol, executive director of Harvard Law School’s Criminal Justice Program of Study, Research and Advocacy, recently spoke with the Harvard Gazette about the HLS program, his role in it, and a conference sponsored by the new initiative on how the media helps shape the criminal justice narrative.

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy visits HLS

Justice Kennedy

During a conversation Thursday with Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow at Wasserstein Hall, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy LL.B. ’61 addressed a wide variety of topics, including the American criminal justice system, teaching law abroad, and his opinion on being described as the high court’s swing vote on major issues.

Honored ‘ambassadors for Harvard Law School’ reflect on long friendship


The Harvard Law School Association presented its highest award this past spring to William P. Alford ’77 and Charles J. Ogletree ’78 —two of Harvard Law School’s most distinguished professors, mentors to generations of jurists, advisers to senators, presidents and world leaders, and celebrated doers of good works—and longtime friends.

A Passion for Reform

Jeff Robinson ’81

Jeff Robinson ’81 worked as a Seattle criminal defense lawyer for 34 years—a span of time that, he notes, “basically coincided with the largest increase in our incarcerated population in the history of the United States.” Now, as the newly appointed director of the ACLU’s Center for Justice, he will be tackling that metastasis head-on.

HLS Authors: Selected Alumni Books

Alumni Books-Seattle Justice  HLB Fall 2015

“Seattle Justice: The Rise and Fall of the Police Payoff System in Seattle,” by Christopher T. Bayley ’66 (Sasquatch Books). In the early 1970s, as the newly elected prosecutor in King County, Washington, Bayley was intent on changing the culture of corruption in Seattle that had been in place for a century. His memoir tells the story […]

PILAC report finds doctors may risk prosecution for treating alleged terrorists


Doctors who provide medical assistance to people labeled terrorists are increasingly vulnerable to prosecution in the United States and other Western democracies, according to a law briefing by the Harvard Law School Program on International Law and Armed Conflict (PILAC).