Harvard Gazette: Old Harvard, old France, old crime

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  Exhibit spanning centuries of law combines detailed scholarship with a touch of scandal The Harvard Law School Library is a launching point for well-trained modern lawyers, but it is also a time machine. Scholars or the merely curious are free to climb into the library’s Historical and Special Collections, which house tens of thousands […]

History by degrees

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The Harvard Gazette recently published “History by degrees,” an article and slideshow featuring Harvard diplomas of the 17th and 18th centuries. The article, which looks at the early history of Harvard diplomas, features a slideshow of Harvard diplomas, including: ·      The earliest Harvard Law School diploma in the University’s collections, from 1839. It memorializes an […]

The Insular Cases: Constitutional experts assess the status of territories acquired in the Spanish–American War (video)

Reconsidering Insular Cases

More than 100 years after the U.S. Supreme Court decided a series of cases that left citizens of territories including Puerto Rico, Guam and the American Samoa with only limited Constitutional rights, Harvard Law School hosted a conference to reconsider the so-called Insular Cases and the resonance they continue to hold today.

Recent Faculty Books – Winter 2014

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“The New Black: What Has Changed—and What Has Not—with Race in America,” edited by Professor Kenneth W. Mack ’91 and Guy-Uriel Charles (New Press). The volume presents essays that consider questions that look beyond the main focus of the civil rights era: to lessen inequality between black people and white people. The contributors, including HLS Professor Lani Guinier, write on topics ranging from group identity to anti-discrimination law to implicit racial biases, revealing often overlooked issues of race and justice in a supposed post-racial society.

HLS Authors: Selected alumni books

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Brown uses her own example—after leaving a law partnership upon the birth of her daughter, she is now a professor of business law—and those of many others, from a jewelry designer to a nurse to a rabbi, to show the possibilities for those who are unhappy with the practice of law. Such a change is not easy, but a lawyer’s skills can be reframed and refreshed, she says, adding that she has never met a former lawyer who regrets having left the profession.

Lounging with the Law Review

Editorial Board of Volume 51 of the Harvard Law Review

The Harvard Law School Library Blog, “Et Seq.,” frequently publishes historical documents and images from the law school’s archives. For a recent post, they showcased a historical image of the editorial board of Volume 51 of the Harvard Law Review celebrating a successful year outside of Austin Hall.