It’s moot, but it matters: Scalia helps to judge Law School case competition

Ames Moot Court Finals 2014

Third-year Harvard Law School students clashed in the high drama of the venerable Ames Moot Court Competition on Tuesday under the jurisdiction of visiting federal judges, including one of the nation’s foremost legal authorities, U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Antonin Scalia. “It was fully as good as one would expect at Harvard Law School,” a pleased Scalia […]

Gallery: A look inside the 2014 Ames Moot Court Competition

Ames Moot Court Finals 2014

The final round of Harvard Law School’s annual Ames Moot Court competition was held this year on November 18, and was presided over by the Hon. Antonin Scalia ’60, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States; the Hon. Adalberto Jordan, U.S. Court of Appeals Eleventh Circuit; and the Hon. Patricia Millett ’88, U.S. Court of Appeals District of Columbia Circuit.

Obamacare, back on trial: Elhauge on new challenges to the ACA

Einer Elhauge

In a move that caught many observers off guard, the U.S. Supreme Court last week announced it would review one of four cases currently challenging provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Currently, qualified consumers can receive tax subsidies to help them purchase health insurance through the federal- or state-run exchanges. But the plaintiffs […]

Harvard Gazette: Old Harvard, old France, old crime

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  Exhibit spanning centuries of law combines detailed scholarship with a touch of scandal The Harvard Law School Library is a launching point for well-trained modern lawyers, but it is also a time machine. Scholars or the merely curious are free to climb into the library’s Historical and Special Collections, which house tens of thousands […]

History by degrees

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The Harvard Gazette recently published “History by degrees,” an article and slideshow featuring Harvard diplomas of the 17th and 18th centuries. The article, which looks at the early history of Harvard diplomas, features a slideshow of Harvard diplomas, including: ·      The earliest Harvard Law School diploma in the University’s collections, from 1839. It memorializes an […]

The Insular Cases: Constitutional experts assess the status of territories acquired in the Spanish–American War (video)

Reconsidering Insular Cases

More than 100 years after the U.S. Supreme Court decided a series of cases that left citizens of territories including Puerto Rico, Guam and the American Samoa with only limited Constitutional rights, Harvard Law School hosted a conference to reconsider the so-called Insular Cases and the resonance they continue to hold today.