Writ Large

Freedom Is Just Another Word for … Regulation

Property law expert Joseph Singer argues that regulations make markets and property possible and promotes conservatives values. Regulations are needed to protect us from harm and fraudulent actions by others, to ensure that people can acquire property, and to allow all of us to exercise equal freedoms, he writes Continue Reading

Global Prosecutor

In January 2010, Martha Minow, then the new dean of Harvard Law School, taught a seminar examining the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. Bolstering that effort was her co-teacher, Alex Whiting, who later that year would begin a three-year tenure at the ICC, managing first investigations and then prosecutions for the office. The other co-teacher was the ICC’s first chief prosecutor, Luis Moreno-Ocampo. Continue Reading

Faculty Books In Brief—Fall 2015

“Choosing Not to Choose: Understanding the Value of Choice,” by Professor Cass R. Sunstein ’78 (Oxford). Choice, while a symbol of freedom, can also be a burden: If we had to choose all the time, asserts the author, we’d be overwhelmed. Indeed, Sunstein argues that in many instances, not choosing could benefit us—for example, if mortgages could be automatically refinanced when interest rates drop significantly. Continue Reading

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Gallery

Alumni Notes and Newsmakers

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  • A Passion for Reform

    Jeff Robinson ’81 worked as a Seattle criminal defense lawyer for 34 years—a span of time that, he notes, “basically coincided with the largest increase in our incarcerated population in the history of the United States.” Now, as the newly appointed director of the ACLU’s Center for Justice, he will be tackling that metastasis head-on.

  • A Supreme Opera

    “Scalia/Ginsburg,” a comic opera by Derrick Wang, had its world premiere this summer in Virginia. Among those in the audience for the premiere was Justice Ginsburg herself.

  • A Leader on National Security

    A Leader on National Security

    After 15 years in Congress, Adam Schiff has emerged as a leading Democratic voice on national security.

  • The Power of the Outsider

    As head of the primary govern­ment agency tasked with protecting the rights of consumers, Edith Ramirez has focused much of her efforts on digital privacy.

  • Lasting Laughs

    Jonathan Goldstein’s unconventional path helped propel him to success in the entertainment industry.

  • Tenacity Rewarded

    The Yukos case—with its largest-ever arbitration award—was the culmination of Yas Banifatemi's career in international arbitration, which took root at Harvard.

  • HLS Authors: Selected Alumni Books

    “Seattle Justice: The Rise and Fall of the Police Payoff System in Seattle,” by Christopher T. Bayley ’66 (Sasquatch Books). In the early 1970s, as the newly elected prosecutor in King County, Washington, Bayley was intent on changing the culture of corruption in Seattle that had been in place for a century. His memoir tells the story […]

  • A Powerful Platform

    Halfway into his term as president of the Harvard Law School Association, Salvo Arena LL.M. ’00 says one of the questions he hears most often when he meets with other alumni is, What exactly is the HLSA and what does it do?

  • A European (Re)Union

    This past May, Harvard Law School Dean Martha Minow joined HLSA President Salvo Arena LL.M. ’00 and more than 200 other alumni at a celebration to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Harvard Law School Association of Europe, held at the Cercle de l’Union Interalliée in Paris.

  • Leadership profile: A conversation with James A. Attwood Jr. J.D./M.B.A. ’84

    As the law school’s Campaign for the Third Century kicks off Oct. 23, it finds itself in very able hands: One of its co-chairs is Jim Attwood J.D./M.B.A. ’84.