Hepatitis Illustration Price of Life

Tribute

Justice Salia

With the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia ’60 of the U.S. Supreme Court on February 13 has come an outpouring of remembrances and testaments to his transformative presence during his 30 years on the Court. On February 24, Dean Martha Minow and a panel of seven Harvard Law School professors, each of whom had a personal or professional connection to the justice, gathered to remember his life and work. Continue Reading

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Writ Large

Containing Contagion

Containing Contagion

According to HLS Professor Hal Scott, nearly eight years after the 2008 crisis, the U.S. financial system is inadequately protected and more at risk than ever. He sounds the alarm in a new book, “Connectedness and Contagion: Protecting the Financial System from Panics,” forthcoming early this summer from MIT Press. Continue Reading

Inside the World of Jefferson

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History for her book “The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family,” Annette Gordon-Reed ’84 first read a biography of Thomas Jefferson as a child—and hasn’t stopped learning and writing about him. The HLS professor, who is also on the faculty at the university and the Radcliffe Institute, spoke to the Bulletin about her latest book, “Most Blessed of the Patriarchs: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination,” co-written with Peter S. Onuf. She discusses her own fascination with and (measured) admiration for the third U.S. president—and the significance of teaching history at the law school. Continue Reading

Faculty Books In Brief—Spring 2016

“FDA in the 21st Century: The Challenges of Regulating Drugs and New Technologies,” edited by Holly Fernandez Lynch and I. Glenn Cohen ’03 (Columbia). Stemming from a 2013 conference at HLS, the book features essays covering major developments that have changed how the FDA regulates; how the agency encourages transparency; First Amendment issues; access to drugs; and evolving issues in drug-safety communication. These issues, the editors write, lie “at the heart of our health and health care.” Continue Reading

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Gallery

Matt Seccombe at work

Notes of a Nuremberg Documentarian

Nazi war crimes details unearthed in HLS Library collection

In his role at the HLS Library, Matt Seccombe spends much of his day sorting through roughly a million pages of horror, analyzing documents in the HLS Library’s Nuremberg Trials Collection—one of the most extensive collections in the world of documents from the trials of military and political leaders of Nazi Germany and other accused war criminals. Continue Reading

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Alumni Notes & Newsmakers

  • Bert Rein ’64

    A Senior Rookie

    Bert Rein '64 came to Supreme Court advocacy later in life and has ­focused on litigation challenging race-based protections.

  • Caroline Simon preparing for the Williston Competition

    Time Capsule

    In the fall of 1962, Caroline “Cal” Simon ’65 started at Harvard Law, one of 23 women in a class of 540. Her reflections on the experience are perfectly preserved in dozens of sharply witty letters she wrote to her family—letters she rediscovered when her father died. Together, they give an indelible sense of life at the school in the mid-1960s, and specifically, life as a woman there, a decade after women were first admitted.

  • Shepardshaking hands with Nixon

    He Was Not a Crook

    When he was a student at HLS, a friend made Geoff Shepard ’69 a campaign button that said “Nixon Shepard,” representing Shepard’s enthusiasm for the presidential candidacy of Richard Nixon and his hope that he would join Nixon in the White House. Shepard still has the button today and is still advocating for the president he served and defended.

  • An Unexpected Saga

    Therese Rohrbeck Meers on how she became an entrepreneur

  • Uniting in Diversity

    President of the European Court of Justice Koen Lenaerts LL.M. ’78 keeps a photo engraving of Austin Hall in his home office in Leuven, Belgium. The image reminds him of the course he took from then HLS Professor Stephen Breyer ’64 (a 2L named John G. Roberts was also in the class), his LL.M. thesis with Duncan Kennedy, and hours spent perusing newspapers from around the world at Out of Town News in the Square. HLS is also now the alma mater of one of his six daughters.

  • Assistant Attorney General John Carlin ’99

    Quiet Intelligence

    For more than seven years, John Carlin ’99 has been at the center of the most sensitive counterterrorism cases, which have often involved tricky technological questions—first as an adviser to FBI Director Robert Mueller and then at the National Security Division.

  • A Writer in the Spotlight

    Being an in-demand Hollywood screenwriter was not something Josh Singer '01 expected when he was at Harvard Law School.

  • Facing Down Discrimination

    Raheemah Abdulaleem ’01 was standing on a Washington, D.C., street corner in 2009 on her way to work at the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division when a man yelled at her from his car to “go back to your country.” An African-American who grew up in Philadelphia in a family whose roots in the United States are nearly as old as the country, Abdulaleem was wearing a hijab, the traditional headscarf worn by some Muslim women.

  • HLS Authors: Selected Alumni Books Spring ’16

    From sex work to satire to being second-in-command.

  • A conversation with John and Lynn Savarese

    "Advancing human rights and social justice has been a primary concern of mine for decades," said Lynn Savarese. "The three years spent at HLS focusing on fairness in myriad complex contexts helped fuel and shape this endeavor."