From the Dean:

A Place of Ideas and Action

One of the most exciting aspects of Harvard Law School is its consistent engagement with the most important issues of the day. Often HLS will supply the leading voices on both sides of the great and urgent debates about the law and about the institutions, public and private, that structure society. The work of HLS faculty, students, staff, and alumni helps shape how policymakers understand and solve the most challenging local, national, and international problems. Through productive, public discussion and disagreement, our community is able to deepen understanding of the hardest and most consequential questions of democracy, constitutional governance, social justice, finance, international relations, technology, and more. Our school is, as it long has been, a lively, energetic, engaging place of ideas and action.

This issue of the Bulletin seeks to capture some of the breadth and depth of the school’s contributions through stories that reflect our community’s scholarship, professional contributions, and personal journeys. By participating on all sides of important issues, HLS promotes the highest ideals of law and justice. Turn on the news on any given day and you will likely see HLS faculty and alumni contributing expertise and viewpoints from a broad range of perspectives. Coming at issues from many directions is more likely to bring us to truth and nuanced understanding.

In this edition of the Bulletin, we also mark the life, accomplishments, and passing of beloved friend and colleague Professor Emeritus David L. Shapiro ’57, a professor and lawyer who personified scholarly rigor, clarity of thought, and a nuanced understanding of law’s complexity. A legendary teacher and giant in the field of federal courts, David has inspired countless students as well as colleagues—and I count myself among them—with his passion for the field and his deep integrity and generous humanity.

In every aspect of human endeavor, you find Harvard Law School contributing in significant ways. That’s been core to our history and remains a critical part of who we are today.

I wish you all the best in your own endeavors and in the new year!

John F. Manning '85