Collector’s Items

The Harvard Law School Library offers a treasure-trove for legal historians. If one wanted to peruse, for example, a copy of the first printed collection of English statutes from the 15th century, there it would be. Yet, as three recent acquisitions demonstrate, the library also presents the lighter side of the law, with items that reveal the humor and personalities behind the cases and legal decisions that make history.

Supreme Viewing: A Deep Bench

Although arguments in the U.S. Supreme Court are not video-recorded, you can watch many of its justices questioning oralists and presiding over cases—within the State of Ames. Visit Harvard Law School’s archive of video recordings of the final rounds of the Ames Moot Court Competition.

Antonin Scalia ’60 (1936-2016)

“Justice Scalia will be remembered as one of the most influential jurists in American history — he changed how the Court approaches statutory interpretation, and in countless areas introduced new ways of thinking about the Constitution and the role of the Court that will remain important for years to come.”

A Supreme Opera

“Scalia/Ginsburg,” a comic opera by Derrick Wang, had its world premiere this summer in Virginia. Among those in the audience for the premiere was Justice Ginsburg herself.