Hearsay: Short takes from faculty op-eds Summer 2007

Supreme Confusion Professor Charles Fried The New York Times, April 26 “[The Supreme Court’s decision in the partial-birth abortion case is] disturbing because Justice Kennedy fails to come to grips with his own jurisprudence, going so far as to say that because Congress was acting under its power to regulate interstate commerce, it needed only […]

Hearsay: Short takes from faculty op-eds

“People are rightly concerned that [the Supreme Court decision, in Kelo v. City of New London] will give cities license to take private homes just to make wealthy developers even wealthier. But the [Massachusetts] House bill does not respond to that fear. Instead, it identifies certain places–‘a substandard, decadent or blighted open area’–as the only […]

Faculty News Spring 2004

Glendon Wins Inaugural Bradley Prize In October, the Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation awarded Professor Mary Ann Glendon the inaugural Bradley Prize. The $250,000 prize is given to individuals who support “the promotion of liberal democracy, democratic capitalism and a vigorous defense of American institutions,” according to Michael W. Grebe, president and CEO of the […]

Hearsay: Summer 2002

  “[I]f we approve torture in one set of circumstances, isn’t every country then free to define its own exceptions, applicable to Americans as well as its own citizens? Fear of that led us to accept the Geneva Convention prohibiting torture of a prisoner of war, although obtaining his information might save dozens of American […]

CJI Hosts Two Conferences

Civil rights activists, law enforcement officials, and legal experts came together at HLS in December for “Race, Police, and the Community,” a three-day conference sponsored by the Criminal Justice Institute. Among the panelists were Professor Charles Ogletree Jr. ’78, director of CJI; Deborah Ramirez ’81, professor, Northeastern University School of Law; the Reverend Al Sharpton […]

Drum Major for Justice

Professor Charles Ogletree, Jr. ’78 will complete several major writing projects begun by his late friend and mentor, A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., chief judge emeritus of the U.S. Third Circuit Court of Appeals, who died in December.