Judges and their toughest cases

“Tough Cases,” a new book in which 13 trial judges from criminal, civil, probate, and family courts write candid and poignant firsthand accounts of the trials they can’t forget, was the subject of a lively discussion at a panel sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library, which drew a packed house at Wasserstein Hall in October.

The challenge of counseling the commander in chief

A discussion about “The Office of Legal Counsel and the Challenge of Legal Advice to the President” shed light on the often-mysterious workings of the OLC—the body discussants David Barron ’94 and Harvard Law Professor Jack Goldsmith served on, during Barack Obama’s first term, and, in George W. Bush’s second, respectively.

War Powers: A (Judicial) Review

The post-9/11 war on terror was only 3 years old when David Barron ’94 began researching whether presidents enjoy as much unfettered power to conduct wars as was assumed by many at the time. A dozen years after he began, Barron, now a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 1st Circuit and a visiting professor at HLS, has published the results of his research in a book titled “Waging War: The Clash Between Presidents and Congress 1776 to ISIS” (Simon & Schuster).

Presidential power in an era of polarized conflict

On April 1, Harvard Law School hosted a conference on ‘Presidential Power in an Era of Polarized Conflict,’ a daylong gathering in which experts from both sides of the aisle debated the president’s power in foreign and domestic affairs, and in issues of enforcement or non-enforcement.

David Barron: a Q&A on electronic communications policies

Last year, Harvard President Drew Faust asked Harvard Law School Professor David Barron ’94 to lead a 14-member task force that would make forward-looking recommendations regarding Harvard’s policies on electronic communications. Barron, who was acting assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Counsel in the U.S. Department of Justice from 2009 to 2010, discussed the task force’s recently-released report and proposed policy with the Harvard Gazette.