Urban Legend

“City Bound: How States Stifle Urban Innovation,” forthcoming from Cornell University Press in December, examines how state laws shackle cities. Barron and Frug look at how state law determines what cities can and cannot do to raise revenue, control land use and improve schools.

Hearsay: Short takes from faculty op-eds

The mainstream U.S. media have covered this worldwide uprising; it is, after all, a glimpse into the sentiments of our enemy and its allies. And yet it has refused, with but a few exceptions, to show the cartoons that purportedly caused all the outrage.

Hearsay: Short takes from faculty op-eds

“People are rightly concerned that [the Supreme Court decision, in Kelo v. City of New London] will give cities license to take private homes just to make wealthy developers even wealthier. But the [Massachusetts] House bill does not respond to that fear. Instead, it identifies certain places–‘a substandard, decadent or blighted open area’–as the only […]

Not-So-Eminent Domain

Local governments have long had broad authority to accomplish urban planning through the power of eminent domain–taking land away from private owners for fair market value and converting it to uses that meet public needs.