If at first you don’t succeed…

Elena Kagan was ‘petrified’ when a Law School professor called on her on her first day of class. She blew her first exams, which situated her in ‘the bottom third of the class.’ And then, in her second semester at Harvard Law School, things started to change.

Supreme Viewing: A Deep Bench

Although arguments in the U.S. Supreme Court are not video-recorded, you can watch many of its justices questioning oralists and presiding over cases—within the State of Ames. Visit Harvard Law School’s archive of video recordings of the final rounds of the Ames Moot Court Competition.

Katie Biber ’04

A former election lawyer and the general counsel for Mitt Romney’s 2012 presidential campaign, Katie Biber ’04 now works in Silicon Valley. After a stint as senior counsel at Airbnb, she’s the general counsel and corporate secretary at Thumbtack.

A Pioneer’s Logic

As soon as Yuko Miyazaki LL.M. ’84 joined the Supreme Court of Japan in January 2018, she made history and international headlines. The sixth female justice on Japan’s high court, Miyazaki announced she’d be the first to issue opinions under her maiden name—an option not available to female judges in Japan until 2017.

Harvard Law School welcomes the Class of 2021!

For more than two centuries, thousands of students have been shaped by — and have shaped — a great tradition of rigorous legal reasoning and analysis at Harvard Law School. The Class of 2021 joined that long tradition last week as they gathered in Cambridge with their fellow classmates for J.D. Orientation.

The Political Solicitor General

With the Supreme Court divided ideologically along partisan lines for the first time in history, the Solicitor General—no matter the administration—has become more political. How did this post, long regarded as the keel keeping the government balanced, come to contribute to forceful tacks one way or the other, to the Court’s seeming indifference?

All rise!

The opening event of Harvard Law School’s Bicentennial summit was one for the history books. Gathering at Sanders Theater were six Supreme Court justices (five current and one retired): Neil Gorsuch ’91, Elena Kagan ’86, David H. Souter ’66, Stephen G. Breyer ’64, Anthony M. Kennedy ’61, and Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. ’79. In a roundtable discussion with Dean John F. Manning ’85, the justices shared memories and more than a few priceless anecdotes.