Double Take

“Carly” Anderson ’12 wrote on Dec. 4 to report that Mitch Reich ’12 had argued Rodriguez v. FDIC before the Supreme Court just the day before. Among those listening to the argument in the courtroom were Anderson and four other HLS classmates—Stephanie Simon, Matthew Greenfield, Stephen Pezzi and Noah Weiss—who, along with Reich, had all been members of the 2011 winning Ames Moot Court Competition team.

All rise!

The opening event of Harvard Law School’s Bicentennial summit was one for the history books. Gathering at Sanders Theater were six Supreme Court justices (five current and one retired): Neil Gorsuch ’91, Elena Kagan ’86, David H. Souter ’66, Stephen G. Breyer ’64, Anthony M. Kennedy ’61, and Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. ’79. In a roundtable discussion with Dean John F. Manning ’85, the justices shared memories and more than a few priceless anecdotes.

The Long Game

However much presidents want to influence the future through their judicial appointments, the problem, Professor Mark Tushnet writes in his new book, “In the Balance: Law and Politics on the Roberts Court” (Norton, 2013), “is that things change.”

HLS Authors: Selected alumni books

“Client Science: Advice for Lawyers on Counseling Clients through Bad News and Other Legal Realities,” by Marjorie Corman Aaron ’81 (Oxford). No one likes to deliver bad news—attorneys included. But oftentimes providing honest and difficult advice is a crucial part of the job, and Aaron offers her own advice on how best to do it.

Supreme Reporting

Not every U.S. Supreme Court decision is awaited by a breathless nation. But when an issue strikes fire with the greater populace, those tasked with covering the high court had better get it right. When the justices ruled on President Obama’s health care law this summer, Greg Stohr was first, and Greg Stohr was right.