Op-ed by Laurence Tribe: Alito’s world

The following op-ed by Professor Laurence Tribe, Alito’s world, appeared in The Boston Globe on November 7, 2005: You can’t help doing a double-take when you read Judge Samuel Alito’s opinion holding Congress powerless to compel states to provide family medical leave to their employees.

Hearsay: Short takes from faculty op-eds

“People are rightly concerned that [the Supreme Court decision, in Kelo v. City of New London] will give cities license to take private homes just to make wealthy developers even wealthier. But the [Massachusetts] House bill does not respond to that fear. Instead, it identifies certain places–‘a substandard, decadent or blighted open area’–as the only […]

Op-ed by Professor Tribe: Gentleman of the Court

The following op-ed by Professor Laurence Tribe, Gentleman of the Court, originally appeared in The New York Times on September 6, 2005: In October 1971, the White House tapped Assistant Attorney General William H. Rehnquist to respond to my critique of someone at the top of its short list for one of the two vacancies created by the nearly simultaneous resignations of two justices.

Hearsay: Excerpts from faculty op-eds Fall 2004

“If the pattern holds, then the record industry’s response to file sharing–trying to block the technology altogether–would generate the worst of all possible results. To its credit, the industry has started to participate in paid music download services like iTunes, but a better solution would be to institute a monthly licensing fee paid by Internet […]

Hearsay: Spring 2002

Several HLS faculty members have written about the response to the terrorist attacks of September 11. Excerpts from selected opinion pieces follow.

HLS Makes Its Mark on Presidential Contest

  In the dispute over the results of the 2000 presidential election, political affiliation could almost uniformly predict one’s position. While Laurence Tribe ’66, a constitutional law professor at HLS, backed Al Gore in the election, he said partisanship did not propel him in front of the Supreme Court to argue the vice president’s case. […]

Hearsay: Summer 1999

“Outside of this context of shared assumptions, e-mail functions like bad poetry where any meaning can be put into the e-mail depending on what you’re trying to see. And that makes it a very dangerous type of document outside of context that people can control.” -Professor Lawrence Lessig, during March 11 interview about e-mail as […]