Are Americans Getting Enough Fiber?

Fiber optic technology, which results in dazzlingly fast and reliable internet connectivity, should be available at a low price to everyone in the U.S., as it is in other countries, argues Susan Crawford. Because of a series of telecom policy decisions, the U.S. is falling further and further behind other nations. On the national level, almost no one is paying attention, says Crawford. And she is out to change that.

JET-Powered Learning

Through a sweeping array of new, hands-on courses, Harvard Law School’s January Experiential Term, or JET, gives 1L students a chance, early in their time on campus, to learn by doing, to work in teams, and to explore—or discover—what inspires their passion in the law.

Martha Minow on the art of asking good questions

Addressing the Harvard Law School graduating class, former Dean Martha Minow focused on the art of asking good questions—a talent she told the students would be key to their work in the future, and a skill that they should ‘cherish and cultivate.’

Andrew Manuel Crespo: Practice Meets Theory

As staff attorney with the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia for more than three years, Assistant Professor Andrew Manuel Crespo ’08 represented adults and juveniles charged with felonies ranging from armed robberies to homicides. Passionate about the work, he had no plans to become an academic. But early in his career, then-Dean Martha Minow engaged him in a life-changing conversation.

25 Million Sparks: Andrew Leon Hanna ’19 on his prize-winning book project

Andrew Leon Hanna ’19 recently won the 2018 Bracken Bower Prize from the Financial Times and McKinsey & Company for the best book proposal about emerging businesses from someone 35 or under. Hanna’s book proposal, “25 Million Sparks”, aims to celebrate refugee entrepreneurs.

Judges and their toughest cases

“Tough Cases,” a new book in which 13 trial judges from criminal, civil, probate, and family courts write candid and poignant firsthand accounts of the trials they can’t forget, was the subject of a lively discussion at a panel sponsored by the Harvard Law School Library, which drew a packed house at Wasserstein Hall in October.