Exhibit highlights the first international war crimes tribunal

As the marshal shouted “Let justice be done,” Peter von Hagenbach was beheaded in 1474, after being tried and convicted by the first international criminal tribunal. Created by the Archduke of Austria, the tribunal consisted of 28 judges from different states in the Holy Roman Empire. Von Hagenbach, appointed governor by Charles the Bold, Duke […]

Hearsay: Short takes from faculty op-eds

“People are rightly concerned that [the Supreme Court decision, in Kelo v. City of New London] will give cities license to take private homes just to make wealthy developers even wealthier. But the [Massachusetts] House bill does not respond to that fear. Instead, it identifies certain places–‘a substandard, decadent or blighted open area’–as the only […]

At Home Abroad

HLS faculty and students look to other countries to better people’s lives and increase their own understanding of the world of law.

Hearsay: Summer 2002

  “[I]f we approve torture in one set of circumstances, isn’t every country then free to define its own exceptions, applicable to Americans as well as its own citizens? Fear of that led us to accept the Geneva Convention prohibiting torture of a prisoner of war, although obtaining his information might save dozens of American […]