Early Arrivals

On Tuesday, Aug. 21, Harvard Law School’s Graduate Program officially welcomed the LL.M. Class of 2019 — 188 students from 65 countries who will spend the upcoming academic year pursuing a Master of Laws degree — along with six students set to begin their studies for the Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) degree.

Are there holes in the Constitution?

To gain a better understanding of some of the issues increasingly in play in today’s political climate, the Gazette interviewed Mark Tushnet, Michael Klarman, Steven Levitsky, and Steven Jarding–Harvard faculty members who have expertise in constitutional law and legal history, democratic and authoritarian governments, and American politics.

Military, veterans study at Harvard

This year marks the fifth that Harvard has been a host of the summertime program known as the Warrior-Scholar Project, an academic boot camp intended to help provide members of the armed forces or those recently discharged with the skills and confidence to transition to top-tier colleges.

Preview: “HLS in the Community” will celebrate clinics and bicentennial finale

On April 20, Harvard Law School will host the third and final major event in its year-long program celebrating 200 years of HLS. HLS in the Community will convene alumni, faculty, students, and staff to explore the extraordinary reach and impact of Harvard lawyers.

Marbury v. Madison, Professor v. Protégé

Laurence H. Tribe ’66 and Kathleen Sullivan ’81 have teamed up on many cases since she was a student in his constitutional law class; now, for the first time, they will face off as adversaries in a reargument of the landmark case Marbury v. Madison, part of the Harvard Law School bicentennial celebration on Oct. 27.

Michael Klarman: ‘The cause of social justice needs you as much as it ever has before’

Drawing on his interests in constitutional law, constitutional history, and racial equality, Professor Michael Klarman’s Last Lecture explored the obstacles faced — and in many ways, overcome — by feminist lawyers and African-American civil rights lawyers in the middle of the last century.

Re-enacting the Vincent Chin Trial

As part of the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association’s (APALSA) annual conference, “Soft Power Hard Knockout: The Asian American Punch,” on Feb. 4, Harvard Law School presented a re-enactment of the Vincent Chin trial, written by Judge Denny Chin of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.