Common Knowledge

Zero-L, a new online course, is meant to help all incoming students, including those who don’t have any pre-law background. Featuring an array of Harvard Law School professors, it covers topics ranging from the separation of powers to how to speak in class in response to a cold call.

Presidential Power Surges

Particular moments in history and strategic breaks with unwritten rules have helped many U.S. presidents expand their powers incrementally, leading some to wonder how wide-ranging presidential powers can be.

Harvard Law professor plays instrumental role in creation of Facebook’s content oversight board

New report from Facebook summarizes next steps in a plan to establish an independent content oversight board. For Noah Feldman, who first proposed the idea, helping develop a new approach to one of the most vexing challenges confronting social media has been one of the most exciting things in his professional life.

A State of Danger?

“It Can’t Happen Here,” the novel by Sinclair Lewis written in the 1930s as fascism was rising in Europe, imagines an America overtaken by an authoritarian regime. The new book edited by Harvard Law Professor Cass Sunstein ’78, “Can It Happen Here?: Authoritarianism in America” (Dey Street Books), does not predict the same fate. Yet the contributors—several also affiliated with Harvard Law—take seriously the possibility that it could happen here, despite the safeguards built into the American system of government.

On the Bookshelf: HLS Authors

This fall, the Harvard Law School Library hosted a series of book talks by HLS authors, with topics ranging from Justice and Leadership in Early Islamic Courts to a Citizen’s Guide to Impeachment. As part of this ongoing series, faculty authors from various disciplines shared their research and discussed their recently published books.

Harvard Law School scavenger hunt for public interest

More than 350 students raced through the halls of Harvard Law School solving clues, answering trivia questions, and taking selfies with professors as part of the school’s first ever Public Interest Scavenger Hunt, which had students competing for prizes as the community came together to show support for students working in public interest law.