Oh, what a tangled web we weave

Deception spreads faster than truth on social media. If a healthy democracy relies on an informed populace — or at least one not deliberately disinformed by malicious actors — then the prevalence of disinformation is an existential threat. What, if anything, can or should be done?

Should the internet be treated like a public utility?

At the annual Klinsky Lecture, Visiting Professor John G. Palfrey ’01, president of the MacArthur Foundation, says we need a regulatory regime for technology.

Tracing the disinformation campaign on mail-in voter fraud

A new report from Harvard Law School Professor Yochai Benkler ’94 and a team of researchers from the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society shows that the mail-in voting fraud disinformation campaign—intentionally spreading false information in order to deceive—is largely led by political elites and the mass media.

A Legal Warrior in the Field of Technology

When Marvin Ammori ’03 was a child, he asked his uncle whether there was MTV in Iraq. His uncle, who stayed in the country for a while after his parents had left, said no: Iraq had only two channels, and both showcased President Saddam Hussein. The lack of options left an impression. “That seemed like an injustice,” Ammori says with a laugh.

Heard on Campus

From a U.S. Supreme Court justice to the president of Germany to a senator from Utah to a Hiroshima survivor: “I speak because I feel it is my responsibility.”

Are Americans Getting Enough Fiber?

Fiber optic technology, which results in dazzlingly fast and reliable internet connectivity, should be available at a low price to everyone in the U.S., as it is in other countries, argues Susan Crawford. Because of a series of telecom policy decisions, the U.S. is falling further and further behind other nations. On the national level, almost no one is paying attention, says Crawford. And she is out to change that.