May it please the Court: The Ames experience today and through the years

Everything old is Moot again: Looking back on The Ames Moot Court Competition

In honor of the Harvard Law School bicentennial, and in celebration of the long tradition of the Ames Moot Court Competition at Harvard Law School, here is a look back on Ames featuring historical footage and photographs spanning the competition’s more than 100-year history.

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law 1

Each year, as we honor military veterans nationwide for their service, Harvard Law Today profiles students in the incoming class who have held positions in the Armed Forces. The Class of 2020 includes the largest number of former or current service members in Harvard Law’s recent history.

All rise!

All rise! At HLS, a conversation with six Justices of the U.S. Supreme Court

The opening event of Harvard Law School’s Bicentennial summit was one for the history books. Gathering at Sanders Theater were six Supreme Court justices (five current and one retired): Neil Gorsuch ’91, Elena Kagan ’86, David H. Souter ’66, Stephen G. Breyer ’64, Anthony M. Kennedy ’61, and Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. ’79. In a roundtable discussion with Dean John F. Manning ’85, the justices shared memories and more than a few priceless anecdotes.

Marbury v. Madison, Professor v. Protégé

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Laurence H. Tribe ’66 and Kathleen Sullivan ’81 have teamed up on many cases since she was a student in his constitutional law class; now, for the first time, they will face off as adversaries in a reargument of the landmark case Marbury v. Madison, part of the Harvard Law School bicentennial celebration on Oct. 27.

‘Tree’s’ tremendous legacy: Celebrating Charles Ogletree ’78

‘Tree’s’ tremendous legacy: Celebrating Charles Ogletree ’78

It took an all-star team of panelists to honor the scope and influence of Charles Ogletree’s career last week at HLS—eminent friends, students and colleagues all paying tribute to a man that the world knows as a leading force for racial equality and social justice, and that the Harvard community knows affectionately as Tree.

Spotlight on populist plutocrats: A Q&A with Matthew Stephenson

Spotlight on populist plutocrats

In advance of a conference on Saturday, Sept. 23 at HLS, Harvard Law Professor Matthew Stephenson spoke with the Harvard Gazette about the global phenomenon of “populist plutocrats:” politicians who exploit anti-elite sentiment to win elections, then use the presidency to advance the interests of themselves and their allies.

The legendary Clive Davis on music, law and luck

Clive Davis LL.B. ’56

On Sept. 16, legendary music executive Clive Davis returned to Harvard Law School as the honorary chairman of the HLS in the Arts celebration, and for a screening of the Boston premiere of “Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives,” a film based on his 2013 autobiography.

From Cambridge to Kurdistan

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A typical Harvard Law School student has limited free time. It might be filled with journal work, or student practice organizations, or intramural sports. For a year, Crispin Smith ’18, Nick Gersh ’18, and Ahsan Sayed ’18 spent their free moments exploring the successes and challenges facing religious and ethnic minorities in Iraqi Kurdistan on behalf of the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom.

Benkler report focuses on partisanship, propaganda and disinformation in the 2016 U.S. presidential election

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Many arguments have been made about the media’s influence in the last Presidential election, but Harvard Law Professor Yochai Benkler ’94 has undertaken what may be the most scientific study on the topic to date, “Partisanship, Propaganda and Disinformation: Online Media and the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election.”

Unfazed: Reena Raggi looks back at 30 years on the federal bench

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When Reena Raggi graduated from Harvard Law School in 1976, the student body was only 20 percent female. But Raggi, who went on to serve 30 years on the federal bench—on the District Court for the Eastern District of New York from 1987 to 2002 and since then on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit—never thought of herself as a Harvard pioneer.