Cravath International Fellows explore law abroad

2017 Cravath Fellows

Harvard Law Today recently spoke with three of the 11 Harvard Law School students who were selected as Cravath International Fellows this year, who traveled during winter term to Bogotá, Colombia, Paris, France and Singapore to pursue clinical placements and independent research.

Bringing boardroom experts to the (seminar) table

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In her Corporate Boards and Governance course at HLS, Hillary Sale ’93, Sullivan and Cromwell Visiting Professor of Law, invites a range of high-profile guest speakers to share their experiences with students and explore complex issues that decision-makers at the highest levels are faced with daily.

Picturing Harvard Law School

Picturing Harvard Law School 13

In this collection of photos selected from the Harvard Law School’s Historical & Special Collections, the Harvard University Archives and the Harvard Law Bulletin, threads of continuity are woven throughout the Law School experience, no matter which decade—or even which century—you arrived.

The Constitution: An Origin Story

Writ Large: Klarman HLB Fall 2016

Professor Michael Klarman’s “The Framers’ Coup: The Making of the United States Constitution” gathers for the first time in a single volume the tumultuous story of the 1787 creation of our nation’s founding document, in the kind of rich detail earlier reserved for multivolume works.

Diversity and U.S. Legal History

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During the fall 2016 semester, a group of leading scholars came together at Harvard Law School for the lecture series, “Diversity and US Legal History,” which was sponsored by Dean Martha Minow and organized by Professor Mark Tushnet, who also designed a reading group to complement the lectures.

Regulated to Death

Writ Large: Steiker  HLB Fall 2016

In their latest collaboration, Professor Carol Steiker ’86 and her brother, Jordan Steiker ’88, a law professor at the University of Texas, have co-written a new book, “Courting Death: The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment,” in which they argue that the Court has failed in its efforts to regulate the death penalty since Gregg v. Georgia, its 1976 decision that allowed capital punishment to resume.