A Word of Trouble

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A hypothetical: A reporter is going to interview Professor Randall Kennedy. The reporter says to a group of coworkers: “That is one righteous nigger.” A colleague complains. The reporter, whose intent was to compliment the professor, is fired for using grossly offensive language.

Jolls and Roe Appointed Professors of Law

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Harvard Law School has named two members of its faculty tenured professors. Assistant Professor Christine Jolls ’93, a leader in the emerging field of behavioral law and economics and a scholar of employment law, and Mark Roe ’75, a Columbia Law School professor who currently teaches corporate law as a visiting professor at HLS, will assume their new posts July 1.

Presidential Politics

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The search committee that ultimately chose Lawrence Summers as the 27th president of Harvard University originally considered hundreds of candidates for the job. One of those charged with narrowing this substantial pool was Conrad Harper ’65–the only HLS graduate on the presidential search committee. Harper is also a member of the seven-person Harvard Corporation, which […]

The Cart Before the Court

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Casey Martin’s legal battle to use a golf cart during PGA tournaments will not affect many other golfers. Yet the case could affect the lives of many disabled Americans, according to Assistant Professor Samuel Bagenstos ’93. As part of a Supreme Court case heard on January, Bagenstos wrote the amici curiae brief in support of […]

Air Unfair

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Adjunct Professor Michael Levine likes to see airlines compete. After all, he helped deregulate the airline industry two decades ago before serving as an executive at three different carriers. But Levine fears new consolidation may kill the competitive industry he helped create as an official at the Civilian Aeronautics Board. So he’s become a vocal […]

HLS Makes Its Mark on Presidential Contest

  In the dispute over the results of the 2000 presidential election, political affiliation could almost uniformly predict one’s position. While Laurence Tribe ’66, a constitutional law professor at HLS, backed Al Gore in the election, he said partisanship did not propel him in front of the Supreme Court to argue the vice president’s case. […]