Embracing the Whole World through the Study and Teaching of Law

Glendon cop 2 Tribute (HLB SU2020)

Mary Ann Glendon communicated an ideal that as students of the law, we were participants in a vast, complex and immensely important human enterprise. She embodied in her own life and generated in others a joy and a passion for what we studied together because it was valuable and relevant to our lives. At the same time, she was never naïve or utopian in this vision of the distinctive nobility and grandeur of law’s ideals. She never lost sight, with clear-eyed realism, of law as a sociological fact—subject to interests and powers—and of the fragility and flaws of every human undertaking.

How to Do Comparative Constitutional Law?

Tushnet Crop 2 (HLB SU2020)

Mark Tushnet is the rare scholar who has made huge contributions to a number of different fields—from Critical Legal Studies to U.S. constitutional law and comparative constitutional law. And inevitably, he has been able to connect these fields and ways of thinking about law and constitutional government, as few other scholars have been willing or able to do.

Landmark SCOTUS ruling affirms Native American rights in Oklahoma and bodes well for tribal rights going forward, says Robert Anderson

Oklahoma-Territories-1885-grab

Robert Anderson, the Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, discusses the latest Supreme Court decision in McGirt v. Oklahoma, a landmark for Native American rights that resolves decades’ worth of legal argument.