Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology (video)

Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology

Visiting Professor of Law and Executive Director of the Harvard Law School Project on Disability Michael Ashley Stein ’88 tackled the global issue of equal access to information in his book “Disability, Human Rights, and Information Technology,” co-edited by Jonathan Lazar, professor of Computer and Information Sciences and Director of the Undergraduate Program in Information Systems at Towson University.

A Q&A with Joseph P. Kennedy III, Harvard Legal Aid Bureau alumnus

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Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III ’09, who got his start in civil legal aid as a student attorney at HLAB representing tenants in evictions, reflects on how his time as HLAB influenced his advocacy in the legislature, and why it is of utmost importance to safeguard access to counsel for those who cannot afford it.

Preview: “HLS in the Community” will celebrate clinics and bicentennial finale

HLS in the Community

On April 20, Harvard Law School will host the third and final major event in its year-long program celebrating 200 years of HLS. HLS in the Community will convene alumni, faculty, students, and staff to explore the extraordinary reach and impact of Harvard lawyers.

HLS faculty and staff join in ‘Week of Service’

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During Spring Break, Harvard Law School staff and faculty volunteered as part of HLS in the Community Week of Service. Together they contributed over 175 volunteer hours at three local service organizations—Community Servings, Cradles to Crayons, and Daily Table.

Two Centuries of Treasures in the Harvard Law School Library: An Exhibit

Collections and Connections Stories of the Harvard Law Library

Over the past 200 years, Harvard Law School has built a collection of primary and secondary law unsurpassed by any other academic law library in the world. The library has served as a repository for the papers, photographs and community ephemera that document the school’s history and traditions. In an exhibit at Langdell Hall’s Caspersen Room that runs until June, the library highlights a selection of material that emphasizes the connection between the library’s impressive collection and its community of users.

Branch returns to her Navajo roots

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Ethel Branch ’08 grew up on her family’s ranch with no electricity, no running water, and a long list of questions about injustice. As she grew up, Branch knew she had to address these questions. “That confusion as to why the world changed when you crossed the Navajo Nation boundary line was a driving question for my youth and my life,” says Branch. It propelled her to study law and policy. And three years ago, at age 36, it led her to become Attorney General of the Navajo Nation.

Documenting the Nuremberg Trials

Ben Ferencz Videos

The Harvard Law School Library uniquely owns and manages approximately one million pages of documents relating to the Nuremberg Trials: thirteen trials conducted just after World War II to prosecute leaders of the Nazi regime. To preserve the contents of these documents—which include trial transcripts and full trial exhibits—the library has undertaken a multi-stage digitization project to make the collection freely accessible online.

Security concerns

Security concerns

The trajectory of state intelligence gathering and invasions of privacy made possible by a digital environment were the focus of a session titled “National Security: National Security, Privacy, and the Rule of Law,” part of the HLS in the World bicentennial summit which took place at Harvard Law School on Friday, October 27, 2017.

Harvard Law Review releases special bicentennial edition

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In honor of Harvard Law School’s bicentennial, in October the Harvard Law Review published a collection of six articles exploring Harvard’s contribution to the development of the law, and how that history will shape the future of the law in theory and practice.