Harvard Law Review releases special bicentennial edition

Harvard Law Review releases special bicentennial edition 6

In honor of Harvard Law School’s bicentennial, in October the Harvard Law Review published a collection of six articles exploring Harvard’s contribution to the development of the law, and how that history will shape the future of the law in theory and practice.

Risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform: A Q&A with Chris Bavitz

Risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform: A Q&A with Chris Bavitz

Managing Director of the Cyberlaw Clinic Professor Chris Bavitz discusses some of the concerns and opportunities of risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform efforts, and the Berkman Klein Center’s work on Ethics and Governance of AI initiative in partnership with the MIT Media Lab.

Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

Julian SpearChief-Morris ’17 is the first indigenous student to lead the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, marking his place in the storied history of the bureau which was founded in 1913 to provide legal services to low-income clients in the Boston area.

From Watergate to Russian election hacking, former special prosecutors reflect on the role of independent counsels

From Watergate to Russian election hacking, former special prosecutors reflect on the role of independent counsels

As part of Harvard Law School’s bicentennial summit, a panel, “Special Prosecutors and Independent Counsels: Investigating the White House and the President of the United States,” gathered six Harvard alumni and faculty members who’ve been involved with nearly every high-profile investigation, from Watergate to Whitewater, to the leaking of Valerie Plame’s identity.

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law 1

Each year, as we honor military veterans nationwide for their service, Harvard Law Today profiles students in the incoming class who have held positions in the Armed Forces. The Class of 2020 includes the largest number of former or current service members in Harvard Law’s recent history.

As a JAG officer, Jenna Reed prosecuted some of the most serious cases in the U.S. Marine Corps

As a JAG officer, Jenna Reed prosecuted some of the most serious cases in the U.S. Marine Corps

As a JAG officer in the U.S. Marine Corps for more than six years, Jenna E. Reed LL.M. ’18 prosecuted and defended some of the most serious cases in that branch of the military, focusing on violent and special victims crimes, including shaken-baby cases and others involving children.

Military experience provides “a level of discipline and willingness to work hard even when it’s uncomfortable,” says Nathan Garrett Jester ’20

Military experience provides “a level of discipline and willingness to work hard even when it’s uncomfortable,” says Nathan Garrett Jester ’20

In becoming a Marine and then a lawyer, Nathan Garrett Jester ’20 is interested in someday going into local or state politics in his home state of Georgia, to serve the community where he was born and raised.

Steven Kerns ’20: “Leading people toward a better world required me to trade in my rifle for books”

Steven Kerns ’20: “Leading people toward a better world required me to trade in my rifle for books”

Steven Kerns ’20 was a high school dropout, a self-described ‘rebel without a cause’ from Long Beach, Calif., when he joined the U.S. Army as a teenager looking for adventure, with vague notions of changing the world.