Documenting the Nuremberg Trials

Ben Ferencz Videos

The Harvard Law School Library uniquely owns and manages approximately one million pages of documents relating to the Nuremberg Trials: thirteen trials conducted just after World War II to prosecute leaders of the Nazi regime. To preserve the contents of these documents—which include trial transcripts and full trial exhibits—the library has undertaken a multi-stage digitization project to make the collection freely accessible online.

The need to talk about race

The need to talk about race

Bryan Stevenson has battled through the courts, defending the wrongly convicted and children prosecuted as adults, while condemning mass incarceration and racial bias in the criminal justice system; now, he is embarking on a fight to start a national conversation about the painful legacy of slavery, which he says “continues to haunt us today.”

On the Bookshelf: HLS Authors

On the Bookshelf: HLS Library Books 2017 12

This fall, the Harvard Law School Library hosted a series of book talks by HLS authors, with topics ranging from Justice and Leadership in Early Islamic Courts to a Citizen’s Guide to Impeachment. As part of this ongoing series, faculty authors from various disciplines shared their research and discussed their recently published books.

Risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform: A Q&A with Chris Bavitz

Risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform: A Q&A with Chris Bavitz

Managing Director of the Cyberlaw Clinic Professor Chris Bavitz discusses some of the concerns and opportunities of risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform efforts, and the Berkman Klein Center’s work on Ethics and Governance of AI initiative in partnership with the MIT Media Lab.

Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

Julian SpearChief-Morris ’17 is the first indigenous student to lead the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, marking his place in the storied history of the bureau which was founded in 1913 to provide legal services to low-income clients in the Boston area.

From Watergate to Russian election hacking, former special prosecutors reflect on the role of independent counsels

From Watergate to Russian election hacking, former special prosecutors reflect on the role of independent counsels

As part of Harvard Law School’s bicentennial summit, a panel, “Special Prosecutors and Independent Counsels: Investigating the White House and the President of the United States,” gathered six Harvard alumni and faculty members who’ve been involved with nearly every high-profile investigation, from Watergate to Whitewater, to the leaking of Valerie Plame’s identity.

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law 1

Each year, as we honor military veterans nationwide for their service, Harvard Law Today profiles students in the incoming class who have held positions in the Armed Forces. The Class of 2020 includes the largest number of former or current service members in Harvard Law’s recent history.

Women refugees and why law matters

Jane Mallei: Women refugees and why law matters

In many ways, Jane’s life in Kenya was idyllic: She was an educated, confident professional woman with a flourishing career, raising a daughter whom she loved dearly. There was only one problem in her life: her husband, who had become increasingly violent and abusive in the privacy of their own home.

Law Review launches new online platform

Harvard Law Review launches new online platform

The Harvard Law Review has announced the launch of the Harvard Law Review Blog, a new platform created to encourage timely discussion of current legal issues, and to connect readers to today’s leading legal scholars and practitioners, providing regular expert analysis of recent legislation, the latest legal theories, and pending cases across the country.