And the ‘Torty’ goes to…

And the ‘Torty’ goes to…

This year, Jon Hanson challenged his torts students to create short documentaries about how tort law might apply to social issues and problems on the edge of the law’s reach. This challenge culminated in the inaugural Torty Awards–a screening and ceremony celebrating their inventive films on climate change, driverless cars, and the Flint water crisis.

Harvard Law Review releases special bicentennial edition

Harvard Law Review releases special bicentennial edition 6

In honor of Harvard Law School’s bicentennial, in October the Harvard Law Review published a collection of six articles exploring Harvard’s contribution to the development of the law, and how that history will shape the future of the law in theory and practice.

Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

Julian SpearChief-Morris ’17 is the first indigenous student to lead the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, marking his place in the storied history of the bureau which was founded in 1913 to provide legal services to low-income clients in the Boston area.

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law

Veterans of service, with a belief in the law 1

Each year, as we honor military veterans nationwide for their service, Harvard Law Today profiles students in the incoming class who have held positions in the Armed Forces. The Class of 2020 includes the largest number of former or current service members in Harvard Law’s recent history.

As a JAG officer, Jenna Reed prosecuted some of the most serious cases in the U.S. Marine Corps

As a JAG officer, Jenna Reed prosecuted some of the most serious cases in the U.S. Marine Corps

As a JAG officer in the U.S. Marine Corps for more than six years, Jenna E. Reed LL.M. ’18 prosecuted and defended some of the most serious cases in that branch of the military, focusing on violent and special victims crimes, including shaken-baby cases and others involving children.

The evolution of American environmental law from Nixon to Trump

The evolution of American environmental law from Nixon to Trump

“The Remarkable Evolution of American Environmental Law from Nixon to Trump and Beyond” panel during Harvard Law School’s bicentennial summit focused on the uncertain future of the Environmental Protection Agency in the current administration. Panelists A. James Barnes ’67, Richard J. Lazarus ‘79, William Reilly ’65 and Gina McCarthy looked at the EPA’s distinguished history.

Women refugees and why law matters

Jane Mallei: Women refugees and why law matters

In many ways, Jane’s life in Kenya was idyllic: She was an educated, confident professional woman with a flourishing career, raising a daughter whom she loved dearly. There was only one problem in her life: her husband, who had become increasingly violent and abusive in the privacy of their own home.

‘Tree’s’ tremendous legacy: Celebrating Charles Ogletree ’78

‘Tree’s’ tremendous legacy: Celebrating Charles Ogletree ’78

It took an all-star team of panelists to honor the scope and influence of Charles Ogletree’s career last week at HLS—eminent friends, students and colleagues all paying tribute to a man that the world knows as a leading force for racial equality and social justice, and that the Harvard community knows affectionately as Tree.

Honoring Charles Ogletree

Honoring Charles Ogletree

Hundreds of friends, former students, colleagues, and well-wishers gathered last Monday in a joyful celebration of the life and career of Harvard Law Professor Charles Ogletree, advocate for Civil Rights, author of books on race and justice, and mentor to former President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama.