Lounging with the Law Review

Editorial Board of Volume 51 of the Harvard Law Review

The Harvard Law School Library Blog, “Et Seq.,” frequently publishes historical documents and images from the law school’s archives. For a recent post, they showcased a historical image of the editorial board of Volume 51 of the Harvard Law Review celebrating a successful year outside of Austin Hall.

The Transformations of Morton Horwitz

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For a young law student arriving at Harvard Law School in the fall of 1988, Morton Horwitz [’67] seemed to encapsulate everything that I (no doubt, naively) expected to see in a Harvard professor. Among the students, he was widely known as “Mort the Tort,” for the passion that he brought to the class with which he was most widely identified.

Navigating the path of a life

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When you next have a free moment online, visit the Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. Digital Suite, launched by the Harvard Law School Library early this year. Panels, like stained glass on a cloudy day, open, to reveal chapters in the life of the famed Supreme Court justice (1841-1935). They grant access to images, documents and […]

Faculty Sampler: From medical tourism to the system of the Constitution

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“Medical tourism—the travel of patients who are residents of one country (the ‘home country’) to another country for medical treatment (the ‘destination country’)—represents a growing and important business,” writes Assistant Professor I. Glenn Cohen ’03 in a recent article.

Looking back at Little Rock: At HLS, Justice Breyer and nine appellate justices revisit Cooper v. Aaron (video)

In October, the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice sponsored a two-day conference looking back at Cooper v. Aaron and the impact it’s had on law and education over the course of 55 years. The event brought together legal scholars, students, and civil-rights lawyers and featured a moot-court proceeding involving U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer and nine appellate judges, to revisit the legal questions raised by Cooper.

Annette Gordon-Reed appointed to Charles Warren Professorship at HLS

Harvard Law School Professor Annette Gordon Reed ’84 — a recipient of the National Book Award for Non-Fiction, the Pulitzer Prize in History, a MacArthur Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, The Dorothy And Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers Fellowship, and a National Humanities Medal — has been appointed to the Charles Warren Professorship of American Legal History.

After Death Camps, a Force for Life

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Human rights lawyer Thomas Buergenthal LL.M. ’61 S.J.D. ’68, author of “A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy,” wrote that his experience as a Holocaust survivor made him a better judge. “I understood, not only intellectually but emotionally, what it is like to be victim of human rights violations. I could, after all, feel it in my bones.”