Harvard Law Bulletin: Summer 2022

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  • An illustration of Lady Justice in white blindfolded with a mask to prevent COVID which is represented by red dots scattered around

    Practicing Law in the Wake of a Pandemic

    When the COVID-19 pandemic brought the global economy to a near halt in March 2020, lawyers — like everyone else — wondered how the crisis would affect not only their health and personal lives but also their work lives.

  • Vote of Confidence

    “How could you hold your politicians accountable if they are making it harder for you to vote?” This is among the questions addressed by election law, says Guy-Uriel Charles, questions that are "core to any modern democracy.”

  • An elderly man sitting in a chair smiles as he looks off to the left

    ‘A Good Time to Serve One’s Country’

    This past April, 77 years after Clark W. Maser ’51 arrived in Marseille to help liberate France from Nazi occupation, he was proclaimed a knight of the Legion of Honor.

  • Power to the People

    With Beyond Legal Aid, Lam Ho ’08 establishes a new model for a public interest law organization built around community partnerships and empowering the people they serve.

  • A man in a light brown plaid jacket sits in front of a rusty red couch

    Up for Debate

    In the world of formal debate from which Harvard Law School student Bo Seo ’24 hails, disagreement is not a faux pas, something uncomfortable to suppress or avoid. Instead, it’s the whole point.

  • Colorful wooden building blocks.

    Adding capacity in conflict zones

    International human rights lawyers explore how local lawyers operate in countries in the midst of, or recovering from, conflict.

  • Close up of an illuminated exit sign in a darkened room.

    Economic exits

    Since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022, more than 1,000 companies have announced plans to curtail operations or trade with the global power.

  • Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton speaks at a press conference outside the Supreme Court.

    ‘Life of the mother’ is suddenly vulnerable

    Law School experts Glenn Cohen and Alicia Ely Yamin discuss how we define pregnancy threat amid the emerging state-federal conflict in the post-Roe United States.

  • Martha Minow seated in her office next to a window.

    Committing to good, for good

    Martha Minow, chair of Harvard & the Legacy of Slavery implementation committee and former Harvard Law dean, discusses ‘dedicating ourselves to a different future.’

  • Deborah Anker

    ‘The Beyoncé of asylum law’

    Clinical Professor Deborah Anker LL.M. ’84, ‘one of the architects of modern refugee law’ and founder of the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program, moves to emerita status.

  • A magnifying glass and a income tax return.

    ‘The odds are long … but not impossible’

    Keith Fogg, clinical professor of law emeritus at Harvard Law School, says that IRS audits of two former FBI officials deserve an investigation, but he doubts tampering.

man sitting outside

In Memoriam: Robert B. Haas ’72: 1947-2021

October 12, 2021

Robert “Bobby” Haas ’72, a lawyer who made his fortune in private equity, became an aerial photographer for National Geographic, capturing the beauty of the world from above, and a motorcycle aficionado, exploring new pathways below. Continue Reading

Woman helping a young man at at computer terminal in a library

Remembering Naomi Ronen: 1937-2021

September 21, 2021

When she retired in 2006, a plaque was put up in the library in Naomi Ronen’s honor. It hangs by the reference area today, a rare tribute, memorializing someone former colleagues and patrons remember as exceptional. Continue Reading

65 Years, Countless Stories: Frederica Brenneman ’53

Frederica Brenneman ’53:  A trailblazer at HLS and in the field of juvenile justice

April 2, 2021

Frederica Brenneman ’53, a member of the first Harvard Law School class to include women, went on to a long career in the Connecticut judiciary focused on child welfare. She was the inspiration for the television show “Judging Amy.” Continue Reading