At Berkman Center symposium, experts explore the line between public and private in today’s interconnected world

[L-R] Conference participants Laurent Stalder (assistant professor, Department of Architecture, ETH Zurich) and Paul Dourish (professor of informatics, Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UC Irvine)

Credit: KRIS SNIBBE / HARVARD NEWS OFFICE [L-R] Conference participants Laurent Stalder (assistant professor, Department of Architecture, ETH Zurich) and Paul Dourish (professor of informatics, Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences at UC Irvine)

On June 9 and 10, Harvard Law School’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society hosted “Hyper-Public: A Symposium on Designing Privacy and Public Space in the Connected World.”

The symposium brought together computer scientists, ethnographers, architects, historians, artists and legal scholars to discuss “how design influences privacy and public space, how it shapes and is shaped by human behavior and experience, and how it can cultivate norms such as tolerance and diversity,” according to the event website.

Participants analyzed how technology is transforming privacy and reshaping what it means to be public as human interactions – personal, professional, financial, etc. – increasingly take place online.

Berkman Center participants included: HLS Professors Jonathan Zittrain, John Palfrey, Charles Nesson and Urs Gasser; Senior Researchers David Weinberger and Ethan Zuckerman; Fellows Judith Donath, danah boyd and Jeffrey Huang; and Managing Director Colin Maclay.

For full coverage of the event, visit the Harvard Gazette online.