A Mother’s Voice

Joel Motley ’78 revisits the life story of his mother, a civil-rights pioneer, through film

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Even when he was 5, Joel Motley '78 knew his late mother was doing important work; now, he has co-produced "The Trials of Constance Baker Motley," a short film about the woman who the first black female Manhattan borough president, New York state senator, and federal judge.

HLS Authors and Auteurs

Selected Alumni Books and Films

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From the Supreme Court, to the SEC, to an unidentified city under siege: legal analysis, memoir, a documentary and more works from HLS alumni.

A conversation with Dariusz Mioduski ’90

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Polish-born lawyer and businessman Darius Mioduski ’90 applied to Harvard Law School not having known English five years earlier. That hopeful step led him on an adventurous career path, from starting out in international M&A and project finance, to his present role as part owner of Poland’s top football club.

The Dealmaker

Top M&A attorney Faiza Saeed is Cravath’s presiding partner

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Faiza Saeed ’91 arrived at Cravath, Swaine & Moore’s New York office as a summer associate in 1990, convinced that the prestigious law firm would be just a way station on her journey home to the West Coast.

Tournament of Champions

Ames winners argue all sides in a case before Supreme Court

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In January, it was as if the U.S. Supreme Court were playing host to a tournament of champions for past winners of the Ames Moot Court Competition, with three attorneys who argued Midland Funding, LLC v. Johnson having been on teams that won the competition within four years of each other at Harvard Law School.

Basketball Stars’ Go-To Guy

Alex Spiro has carved out a niche in his celebrity-filled practice representing NBA players

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Alex Spiro '08 has emerged in short order as the go-to lawyer for professional basketball players who get in trouble with the law in New York--just one slice of Spiro’s clientele, summarized by sports and culture website The Ringer as “the rich, the famous, and the restless.”

Unfazed: Reena Raggi looks back at 30 years on the federal bench

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When Reena Raggi graduated from Harvard Law School in 1976, the student body was only 20 percent female. But Raggi, who went on to serve 30 years on the federal bench—on the District Court for the Eastern District of New York from 1987 to 2002 and since then on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit—never thought of herself as a Harvard pioneer.