A Precarious State

A new book warns that institutional corruption is corroding our nation

Think of an honest used car salesperson. The very idea might seem like an oxymoron. That’s not because no honest people ever sell cars. It’s because the profession as a whole is not considered trustworthy by the public. What if that sense of mistrust were not limited to the used car lot but had spread to institutions the public relies on every day? It has, according to Harvard Law School Professor Lawrence Lessig.

Faculty Books in Brief: Winter 2019

From organized crime to 'butterfly politics' to constitutional democracies in crisis

With the increased use of a massive volume and variety of data in our lives, our health care will inevitably be affected, note the editors of a new collection, one of the recent faculty books captured in this section.

The Price Is Right

Sunstein details how government can best spend money to benefit the public

HLS Professor Cass Sunstein ’78 argues that for all their differences, every president since Ronald Reagan has agreed on one fundamental principle of government. That is, “No action may be taken unless the benefits justify the costs.” Sunstein identifies President Reagan as the main architect of this concept, and he credits the president he served under, Barack Obama ’91, with cementing what he calls “the cost-benefit revolution,” which is also the title of Sunstein’s new book.